Next month:
August 2009

January 2009

Taxes, Taxes, Taxes

I'm quite a bit different than my business-owning peers -- I actually don't mind paying taxes. I get a lot of benefit from those taxes: providing for our common defense, local police and fire protection, and a pretty great infrastructure (by world standards), among many other services that our governments provide.  It is my duty as a citizen to financially support the governments that protect and enable our freedoms.

I feel this way even though those services and those governments should be much more efficient and much less bureaucratic than they are.  So I'm not a typical all-taxes-are-evil type of business owner...

But I hate dealing with taxes.Tax-burden

When I bought this business, I knew that I was going to have to deal more with taxes and payroll issues than when I was an individual employee of a corporation. (Unlike many businesses, we don't send our payroll or most of our taxes out to other professionals. Yet.)

But I totally underestimated the crushing administrative burden of the variety, frequency, and complexity of tax payments.  Besides dealing with federal, state, and local governments (which I expected), I quickly learned that each entity had many different types of taxes, each with different weekly, monthly, and quarterly schedules, and each out-of-sync with the others.  There were many taxes which we paid and documented on a regular basis which had to be re-documented periodically.  Then, in January, the schedule gets jumbled from every other tax period.  It is needlessly complicated and time-consuming. 

Again, I'm a willing taxpayer (although I'd always welcome paying less).  But I don't want to be a tax expert.  And I don't want to be forced to hire one.  And I don't want to spend so much time managing our taxes when it should be spent managing our business... 

There must be a simpler way for businesses to contribute to their governments. 


When markets don't work

Michael Lewis and David Einhorn have written the best summary I've seen of why the recent financial meltdown happened, in an amazing editorial in the New York Times.  Their very long, very well-done article (Part I and Part II) details both how regulation failed and how it is integral to smoothly functioning markets. 

Einhorn is one of the real heroes of this meltdown.  As a brilliant and wrongly-maligned hedge fund manager, he was one of the first and most articulate critics who chronicled the outright fraud, misconduct, willful ignorance, and inbred conspiracy perpetrated by financial companies (like Allied Capital and Lehman Brothers), bond insurers (AMBAC and MBIA), ratings agencies (S&P and Moody's), and government regulators (SEC, Treasury, and the Fed). 

This meltdown (and the hundreds of billions we're throwing at it) are the results of an unfettered, unregulated, so-called "free" market.  Einhorn and Lewis demonstrate why regulation is necessary to a healthy, functioning marketplace.


Discovery tale: Do you have a Bugatti in the garage?

1937-bugattiThe recent discovery of a classic, rare, and dusty 1937 Bugatti in an old English garage got me thinking.

The Bugatti fits neatly into the popular imagination as a kind of "discovery tale".  Discovery tales are those romantic, hopeful stories about finding some valuable piece of treasure in an unexpected place.

The discovery tale permeates our culture:

  • The Rembrandt (or Picasso) in the attic
  • The winning Lotto ticket
  • The mid-19th-century stock certificate left by a long-lost aunt
  • The pot of gold at the end of the rainbow
  • The gambler who wins the big jackpot in Vegas
  • The starlet discovered in the drugstore
  • The search for El Dorado
  • Cinderella
  • The Antiques Roadshow

These are all stories built around the discovery tale.  Usually, the tales result in untold millions for the "discoverers": the family who found the Bugatti will be getting nearly $4.5 million.

It is a compelling story.  Except that it is totally unrealistic.

Don't get me wrong -- I really like these stories, too.  As long as they are treated as fun, fantastical tales.

When the discovery tale becomes a personal strategy for wealth or success, it is a problem.  It is deadly when it becomes a build-it-and-they-will-come business strategy.

It is a problem in two ways.  First, it promotes faith in a highly unlikely outcome.  What do I mean?  Let's be generous and suppose that there are 100,000 Bugattis (or Rembrandts or jackpots or stock certificates) in the world.  Only a fraction of those Lotto tickets are going to be found in any one year (it took nearly 50 years for the family to find the Bugatti - there's a reason that such discoveries are so rare and notable).  Again, let's be generous and assume that 5% of these (5,000 or so) are discovered per year.

At this point, there is literally a one-in-a-million chance that you will be the discoverer of the next Bugatti in 2009.  And that's after being generous with our assumptions.

If you are now tinkering with the assumptions -- "Maybe there are really a million Bugattis and there's really a 20% chance of finding one..." -- please STOP.  It is nice to hope, but it is destructive to manipulate the odds in order to justify hoping.

The second big problem with discovery tale strategies is that they are passive.  Discovery tales encourage waiting and hoping as a substitute for industry and ingenuity.  People put off getting a better job or starting their own business while they wait for "things" to get better or for their lottery ticket to come in. 

So am I a total cynic?  No.

Everyone has undiscovered treasure.  But you don't find it.  You use it.  Your treasure lies in your hands and between your ears.  You are the garage -- go make your rare Bugatti.

[where: United Kingdom]